Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Top Ten Tuesday (heroines)

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This week the ladies at The Broke and the Bookish are asking who our literary heroines are. Since I don't read as much fiction as nonfiction, my list includes a little of both.


First, for a few feisty pint-size characters:



Olivia
Of the Olivia picture books. Olivia has a style (and personality) all her own.

Eloise
Of the classic Eloise books. I think you'd RAW-ther like Eloise.

Clementine
Clementine tries hard, but things don't always go her well-intentioned way.


Next, a couple young ladies who couldn't be more different:



Scout Finch
Possibly my favorite fictional heroine of all time. Scout couldn't have been written better. And the part of me that has always imagined what Scout would grow up to be with be satisfied this summer!

Beth March
I know you're supposed to identify and love Jo March for her determined dreams, but sweet Beth was always my favorite March sister.
 
 
A couple of grown up heroines:
 

 
Elinor Dashwood
The more practical of the Dashwood sisters, she nonetheless yearns for the same things as her impulsive, naïve younger sister.

Katie Nolan
When it comes to A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, I can't really decide between Francie Nolan or her mother Katie. After my first reading, years ago, I would have chosen Francie without giving her mother a second thought. Returning to the book, however, I think the plot is as much Katie's as Francie's.
 
 
And lastly, a few nonfiction heroines:
 

Zippy
A wonderfully written memoir with an Olivia-like (see above) character. Even if the stories of her childhood are embellished, Haven Kimmel has created a lovable, quirky characterization of her younger self.

Lillian Gilbreth
After her husband's death forces her to raise her 11 children on her own in the early 1900s, this marvel of motherhood never loses her cool head or warm heart.

Evelyn Ryan
Raising 10 kids with an alcoholic husband and limited means, Evelyn supplements her family's income with cash and prizes won through contesting and jingle-writing. Her faith in herself is inspiring.


Who are your literary heroines?

10 comments:

  1. These are awesome. I love the variety between juvenile and adult, fiction and nonfiction.

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  2. Thanks, Amy. Looking these over, I've been trying to figure out what the common thread is, and I think that it's strength of character--in all its forms.

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  3. Aww, I always liked Beth March, too. She was such a sweetheart. I'm glad you included her. :) (Although I must say, I do relate to Jo better. :)
    (Following your blog now!)

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    1. Welcome, Aidyl! It's funny, I was a high-schooler who wanted to be a writer some day, and I still chose Beth over Jo!

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  4. Scout Finch is a great one. I am rereading To Kill A Mockingbird right now (actually listening to it). I had forgotten how much I loved that book.

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  5. I love the choices that you've mentioned above. One of my personal favorite heroines is Elizabeth from Pride and Prejudice. I also loved Nancy Drew as a child. She was definitely one of my favorites!

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    1. I missed out on Nancy Drew. I wonder if it's too late to "discover" her?

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  6. I love Beth too, and totally disagree with readers who find her insipid.

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    1. I don't believe in nice girls finishing last! :)

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